Vines, buds, bark, potential emerald ash borer infestation, feathers, jabbiness, lichen, buckthorn, and good times.

More yesterday-pics. The first ten or twelve or so are all taken in our back garden by a large downed tree and down the lane o’ raspberries.

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It reminds me of one of those little molecular model-building kits.

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Glaucous bloom on black raspberry

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Don't touch. Young Eastern redcedar leaves.

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Little web on Eastern redcedar branch.

Alright, it’s time for a departure down sad lane. The next few pictures are from what I think might be an invasion of emerald ash borer (EAB) on what I think might be a green ash. EAB is decimating ashes across the Midwest, the eastern U.S. and parts of Canada.

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Those squiggly lines are galleries, showing where the larvae (whatever type they may have been) fed.

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This bark is really chewed up, obviously. You can see some of those larval feeding galleries and possibly exit holes (where the larvae, well, exited -- the EAB's exit holes are D-shaped, but they're also really small, about 1/8th of an inch, so it's difficult to tell if these meet that description). A lot of these could be holes from woodpeckers, too, which often feed on more distressed trees like this.

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Adventitious shoot, that is, a shoot arising other than from an expected place. This is growing lower down on the trunk.This is a possible symptom of emerald ash borer.

There were also thin fissures up and down the length of the tree (another symptom) that I didn’t get any pictures of.

Many of the next pictures were taken around a ring of trees growing along the very steep hill overlooking a ravine on the other side of our house. Coming from the sad, infested ash tree, I had a bug’s-eye perspective in mind. I am the emerald ash borer, I said to myself. That’s almost as powerful and cool as “I am the lizard king.”

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Pretend you're a little larva peering outside of your safe little hidey-hole under the bark for this one. Can larvae even see? Do they need to? Who cares, you can see in this imagining.

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Looking at a tree...from inside a tree. Alright, not inside of it, obviously, but from a chunk of bark that had peeled away.

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View of little fruiting bodies (the part of the fungus you see) nestled inside cracked bark

Next there was some extensive vine-age growing up many of the trees.

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Aerial roots of Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia)

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More Virginia creeper.

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Virginia creeper holdfast?

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I'm not sure what tree this is, but I love the greyish and coppery patches and the big lenticels.

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I was obsessed with this little knot in this one tree, which was growing in the little ring with four or five others.

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Mystery tree.

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Mystery buds. They are red. Hey, maybe it's a WILD REDBUD.

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Now that's just sad. This is the bark of the dreaded buckthorn (Rhamnus spp.), an invasive plant which is a big problem in Minnesota. It has really beautiful bark, though. In the last century, some species of buckthorn cultivated for ornamental use were still being planted in Minnesota. No more!

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If I remember correctly, this little branch is from one of the buckthorns. Go, little lichen, go!

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This is the underside of a Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) limb. They have gorgeous orange shredding bark on the upper parts of the trunk and on the underside of limbs like this one.

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23 thoughts on “Vines, buds, bark, potential emerald ash borer infestation, feathers, jabbiness, lichen, buckthorn, and good times.

  1. Great photos. I have a tree that is losing its bark and I’ve wondered if it doesn’t have an EAB infestation. I’ll have to go back & look for the galleries, fissures, and exit holes.

  2. Pingback: February 16 « One Day | One Image

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