WELCOME SPRING

5000+ bloggers and spambots are now following Sarah Takes Pictures, this monument to garden minutiae, cats, and general photo sprees in fits and starts! That’s pretty crazy to me, so thank you all very much. Also, this is my 500th post!

These pictures are from a recent jaunt out to my folks’ on a day of much gardening.

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DREAMY FERN FOLIAGE

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TRICOLOR SEDUM

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BERGENIA FLOWERS AS SEEN BLURRILY LOOKING UP THROUGH BERGENIA LEAVES

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SOME LEFTOVER ONION PEEL FROM LAST YEAR GLOWING LIKE A GEM !!!

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I BOUGHT SOME THRIFT (ARMERIA) AND PLANTED IT NEAR WHERE THE ONIONS WERE LAST YEAR

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THE CRABAPPLE TREE WAS IN FULL BLOOM THIS WEEK

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FLOWERS LOST THEIR PETALS

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A CARPET O’ MOSS, FALLEN PETALS, AND WOOD CHIPS

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CHIVES ABOUT TO BLOOM

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FERN

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MOSS IN A GARDEN LOG AND A BIRD BATH

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BLURRED GRAPE HYACINTH THROUGH DAFFODIL LEAVES

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FALSE SOLOMON’S SEAL AT SUNSET

May is kicking my ass.

Spring would be nice

After two weeks of legitimate winter, I’m ready for spring. Hasty, yes. But it’s slippery out. Here are a couple pictures around the old homestead taken during the spring in years past.

Crabapple fruit from the previous year

Sedum and Pin Oak Leaves

An old log

A nearby farm

Out in the woods behind my parents' house -- I'm not sure who pounded all these nails in this log, or why. You can see some of the early spring plants that carpet the forest floor below

Chinese lantern fruit in its husk

Washing the pulp off Chinese lantern seeds in a flour sifter, getting ready to help the lantern continue its nigh unstoppable rhizomatous spread in a new garden

Here’s something new I learned today. Chinese lantern is in the same genus as tomatillos (Physalis), a fact I should not have found as surprising as I did given that they share such similar seed covers, and probably other traits I hadn’t noticed. On that note, it would be fun to make a floral arrangement with both plants. I will try that this year if I can recover from the profound mental scarring caused by the college plant breeding experiment from hell, which prominently featured tomatillos.